Sustainable Resolutions for 2021 


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 Sustainability  -  December 2020

Sustainable Resolutions for 2021 

Happy New Year 2021

Looking forward to a Sustainable New Year 

If you’d like to minimize your environmental impact in 2021 and aren’t sure where to start, here are some ideas.

  

  1. Minimize waste in one room of your home. Choosing one area to focus on in your home is a great place to start. Work on minimizing plastic, DIYing some things, and reducing your use of energy and unnecessary items.
  2. Carry reusable bags, utensils and straws.  
  3. Reduce plastic and packaging when grocery shopping. Shop the bulk and produce sections on the perimeter of the store first to minimize purchasing the packaged goods in the middle aisles. Be sure to bring your own reusable shopping and produce bags with you to the grocery store.  
  4. Swap one disposable for a reusable alternative. Here are some easy swaps: Choose reusable utensils and straws instead of disposable.  Air dry your hands when you’re out and use cloth napkins and rags at home. Use a reusable water bottle instead of disposable water bottles. Keep a reusable tote to use for shopping instead of single-use plastic bags. 
  5. Wash your clothes in cold water.  
  6. Eat less meat. Eating less meat and dairy will substantially reduce your carbon footprint. Committing to eating less meat can take many forms, including opting for a Meatless Monday, only eating meat and dairy on the weekends or opting to be completely vegan. Decide what works best for you! 
  7. Watch or read an environmental documentary or book every month. 
  8. Switch up your commute. Instead of driving to work or school every day, try taking public transportation, carpooling, biking, e-scootering, or walking at least once a week! Or you can avoid a commute altogether by trying to work from home at least one extra day per week, if your job allows. 
  9. Limit the number of new items you purchase. You can do this by checking for second-hand options before you buy something new, or limiting the number of new items you purchase every month.  
  10. Start composting. This can be done in a variety of settings, including apartments. 
  11. Shop locally. This will help reduce carbon emissions and grow your local economy. 
  12. Choose organic whenever possible.  Organic farms use less resources, protect pollinator bees, prevent air and groundwater pollution, and increase biodiversity. 
  13. Skip the fast fashion. Fast fashion is inexpensive clothing produced rapidly by mass-market retailers in response to the latest trends. Not purchasing fast fashion will help reduce water pollution, toxic waste and water consumption. If you must purchase new clothes, shop local thrift and consignment stores first and prioritize high-0quality, durable and timeless clothing. 
  14. Hang your laundry out to dry. Dryers use a lot of energy. Try using a clothes line or foldable rack when feasible.  

How to Save Energy During Covid-19

Home Energy

Social distancing efforts to combat the spread of Covid-19 has many of us spending more time at home. Between remote learning, working from home and reduced capacity limits at many businesses, our homes have become schools, offices, restaurants and recreation centers. All of this time at home has increased energy usage. Here is a great resource from The Energy Team at Compare The Market on how to save money on energy during thepandemic:     

 21 useful tips to save on energy bills during coronavirus

 

http://www.salon.com/2014/01/24/chris_christies_texas_horror_meet_the_scandalous_prison_company_hes_long_promoted/


Friday, Jan 24, 2014 1:30 PM UTCChris Christie’s Texas horror: Meet the scandalous prison company he’s long promoted
A corporation Christie's lobbied for and long pushed runs notorious detention center with a slew of vocal opponentsJosh Eidelson Follow Skip to CommentsTopics: Bill Palatucci, Bill Stepien, Chris Christie, Editor's Picks, ICE, Immigration, Lobbyist, New Jersey, Prison, Texas, Elections News, Media News, Business News, News, Politics News[Chris Christie's Texas horror: Meet the scandalous prison company he's long promoted] Chris Christie (Credit: Reuters/Lucas Jackson)



A controversial company promoted by Chris Christie runs an immigrant detention center in Texas slammed by advocates as one of the nation’s worst. The facility is used by the federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency to house immigrant detainees who are seeking asylum in the United States.

And, noting Christie’s “long and very close relationship with Community Education Centers,” the private company running the facility for ICE, one critic told Salon, “I think it’s time people start asking questions, because this company’s practices are not confined to New Jersey.”

“I’ve visited a bunch of detention facilities in Texas, and that’s by far the worst,” said the opponent, Bob Libal, who directs the prison reform group Grassroots Leadership and visited the Polk County Adult Detention Center with other activists in 2012 and 2013. His allegations echo a 2012 report from the Detention Watch Network, a coalition including the ACLU and the American Immigration Lawyers Association as well as Libal’s group: “Inadequate medical care, poor nutrition, lack of access to legal services, absence of meaningful programming, and a willful neglect of those who are imprisoned there plague the Polk detention center.”

Spokespeople for Christie and for CEC did not provide comment in response to Thursday inquiries.

CEC’s ties to Chris Christie and track record running halfway houses in New Jersey have drawn harsh scrutiny, including a series of stories in the New York Times. Reporter Sam Dolnick wrote in 2012 that Christie, who was a registered lobbyist for CEC in 2000 and 2001, “has long championed the company,” and the state had paid out tens of millions to CEC but “not closely examined” its “financial standing or operations, according to documents, former company executives and state officials.” Former employees told the Times “that the company had kept staffing levels very low” and thus “did a poor job delivering counseling and other services intended to help inmates make the transition to society.”

The Times also wrote that the Christie administration “took no action in response to the [state] comptroller’s warning,” following a critical audit of New Jersey halfway houses, “that regulators were kept in the dark about Community Education’s finances.” When legislators responded to a Times investigation by passing stronger halfway-house oversight rules, Christie narrowed them with a line-item veto, a move the Times noted drew accusations of “trying to protect Mr. Palatucci, the company executive who is his close friend.” The paper wrote that documents suggest CEC CEO John Clancy “highlighted Mr. Palatucci’s ties to Mr. Christie in an effort to impress investors and secure desperately needed financing for the company.”

That’s Community Education Centers’ then-senior vice president Bill Palatucci, a close Christie friend and adviser – part of an inner circle that shrunk this month when the George Washington Bridge scandal spurred Christie to dismiss strategist Bill Stepien. After the Times reported widespread issues with violence under CEC’s watch, Palatucci slammed the paper as the “handmaiden of the liberal left.”

Palatucci left CEC in November 2012 and served as chairman of Christie’s 2013 reelection campaign and co-chair (along with Christie’s brother) of his inaugural committee. (The 2013 Christie campaign has received a legislative subpoena as part of the “Bridgegate” scandal, its attorney confirmed Thursday to the New York Times.)

“There is probably nobody more important to Chris Christie’s political operation than Bill Palatucci,” former state GOP chairman Jay Webber told the National Review’s Eliana Johnson in December. Johnson reported that state Republicans expected Palatucci would take a significant role in any Christie presidential run. Last summer, National Journal’s Josh Kraushaar floated Palatucci as a potential Christie choice for placeholder to fill the seat of deceased Sen. Frank Lautenberg, though he argued Palatucci would make “a controversial pick” given his ties to CEC.

Pics

 

http://m.dailykos.com/story/2014/1/24/1272261/-Christie-tied-to-scandalous-private-prision-company-and-its-former-vice-president-Bill-Palatucci


Christie tied to scandalous private prison company and its former vice president Bill Palatucci
Jan 24, 2014 4:17pm EST by HoundDog
[Comment large] 81 153Salon's Josh Eidelson is breaking an original story, Chris Christie’s Texas horror: Meet the scandalous prison company he’s long promoted, about Governor Christie's lobbying for the controversial corporation that owns these immigration detention centers, criticized as being some of worst in the country. It turns out that the former senior vice-president of the Community Education Centers, Bill Palatucci, also served as chairmen of Christie's 2013 reelection campaign, and is co-chair of Christie's inaugural committee, and part of his innermost circle.  


“I’ve visited a bunch of detention facilities in Texas, and that’s by far the worst,” said the opponent, Bob Libal, who directs the prison reform group Grassroots Leadership and visited the Polk County Adult Detention Center with other activists in 2012 and 2013. His allegations echo a 2012 report from the Detention Watch Network, a coalition including the ACLU and the American Immigration Lawyers Association as well as Libal’s group: “Inadequate medical care, poor nutrition, lack of access to legal services, absence of meaningful programming, and a willful neglect of those who are imprisoned there plague the Polk detention center.”

CEC’s ties to Chris Christie and track record running halfway houses in New Jersey have drawn harsh scrutiny, including a series of stories in the New York Times. Reporter Sam Dolnick wrote in 2012 that Christie, who was a registered lobbyist for CEC in 2000 and 2001, “has long championed the company,” and the state had paid out tens of millions to CEC but “not closely examined” its “financial standing or operations, according to documents, former company executives and state officials.” Former employees told the Times “that the company had kept staffing levels very low” and thus “did a poor job delivering counseling and other services intended to help inmates make the transition to society.”The Times also wrote that the Christie administration “took no action in response to the [state] comptroller’s warning,” following a critical audit of New Jersey halfway houses, “that regulators were kept in the dark about Community Education’s finances.” When legislators responded to a Times investigation by passing stronger halfway-house oversight rules, Christie narrowed them with a line-item veto, a move the Times noted drew accusations of “trying to protect Mr. Palatucci, the company executive who is his close friend.” The paper wrote that documents suggest CEC CEO John Clancy “highlighted Mr. Palatucci’s ties to Mr. Christie in an effort to impress investors and secure desperately needed financing for the company.” ...


http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-prison-industry-in-the-united-states-big-business-or-a-new-form-of-slavery/8289

Global Research, December 08, 2013

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Human rights organizations, as well as political and social ones, are condemning what they are calling a new form of inhumane exploitation in the United States, where they say a prison population of up to 2 million – mostly Black and Hispanic – are working for various industries for a pittance. For the tycoons who have invested in the prison industry, it has been like finding a pot of gold. They don’t have to worry about strikes or paying unemployment insurance, vacations or comp time. All of their workers are full-time, and never arrive late or are absent because of family problems; moreover, if they don’t like the pay of 25 cents an hour and refuse to work, they are locked up in isolation cells.

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